FIRST CERTIFICATE TEST # 2
ANSWERS ACTIVITY # 3

SMOKING AND YOUNG PEOPLE

ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, WHO ...

1.

explains the nature of nicotine?

2.

began smoking because of the people he/she knew?

3.

became addicted to cigarettes without realising it?

4.

explains why young people feel more relaxed smoking?

5.

explains why stopping smoking is good for your health?

6.

would have been embarrassed if he/she had failed to give up?

7.

thinks it is better to give up gradually?

8.

explains why the first few weeks of giving up are the hardest?

9.

thinks that a benefit of giving up is the money you save?

10.

thinks that putting on a little weight is not a big problem?


AUDIO TRANSCRIPTION
The areas highlighted in white show the answers.

DAVE:

You're listening to Style UK and this is Dave Moody on 'Matters Today'. And now we move on to an eternally hot topic – smoking and young people. I have with me Mick, the studio doctor, and on the line is Anna, one of our regular listeners who's recently managed to kick the evil habit. Mick. Anna, welcome to the programme.

MICK:

Hello.

ANNA:

Hi.

DAVE:

Now. we smokers know we shouldn't do it, and yet we also know that the reason it's so difficult to give up is because of the presence in the tobacco of nicotine. Nicotine's a drug, and a highly addictive one at that, and that's what makes a cigarette feel so good for a smoker. Anna, can I ask you – did you know that before you started?

ANNA:

Erm, I don't know, I suppose I sort of did, but when you're young you don't bother about things like that. It was more important for me to be doing what my friends were doing, and they were smoking so I started too, 'cos I didn't want to feel left out. And it made me feel more grown-up, more confident. But before I knew it, I was a packet-a-day person. I still don't know how it happened because at the beginning I hated the taste of the smoke.

DAVE:

Mick?

MICK:

Yes. The tobacco companies are aware of all this. In their advertising they're, they've very cleverly made cigarettes this symbol – false. I might add - of maturity. Smoking then becomes a useful way to cover up the shyness and the uncomfortable feelings that young people naturally experience. But until governments are brave enough to ban cigarette advertising, it's something we have to learn to live with.

DAVE:

It's not an ideal world.

MICK:

It certainly isn't, Dave. But we now know that when you give up, almost all the health risks associated with smoking begin to decrease, no matter how long you've smoked.

DAVE:

Yes, I have the information here somewhere. Erm, yes, yes. After five years without a cigarette, the risk of dying early from smoking-related diseases like lung cancer or heart attacks is reduced by half. And after 15 years the risks have almost disappeared.

MICK:

So medically it is worth giving up. It's never too late to stop.

DAVE:

I know that, but I find it almost impossible to do it. Anna, what did you do?

ANNA:

Well. I followed advice I'd read about. First. I made a list of all the times I smoked and why I needed a cigarette at these times. Then I circled the day on my calendar and told my family and all my friends I was giving up. So then it was a matter of pride not to slip back. I'd made up my mind and there was no turning back.

DAVE:

I've tried before too, but I found it was better to do it slowly, little by little.

MICK:

Yes. but Dave, you still smoke, don't you? Because of the problem of addiction to the nicotine, I think you need to stop once and for all. It's unpleasant for the first couple of weeks, but you need to go through that, to clear your body completely of the harmful effects of the drug.

DAVE:

I know, I'm a failure!! But, leaving that aside for the moment, is he right, Anna?

ANNA:

Yes. it's the first few weeks that are the hardest.

DAVE:

And what about saving money? That's another benefit, isn't it, that you can buy all the things you've always wanted, the new clothes, the holiday abroad.

ANNA:

Well, I think that's a bit of an exaggeration, Dave. But maybe I wasn't smoking enough to really notice.

DAVE:

Mick, is there any other advice you can give?

MICK:

Yes. People sometimes find they want to eat more, and they sometimes put on a bit of weight. I'd say that is something you shouldn't worry about too much: you can always deal with that later. A couple of extra kilos is far less harmful than carrying on smoking.

DAVE:

Well now, let's take a few calls. Remember – if you've got anything to say on the subject, do ring our phone lines on 0171 637 ...

 
 

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