Curso First Certificate Exam

LOS CURSOS DE INGLES GRATIS PREFERIDOS POR LOS HISPANOHABLANTES

 

LECCION 11 - PAGINA 2   índice del curso   página anterior   página siguiente

 

Terror in London

 

 

ACTIVITY 66: Listen to Amy Goodheart, a teacher being interviewed on TV about the London Dungeon, a rather special London museum. Then answer this question. What is she doing? Choose the best alternative from the menu and then check the correct answer.

 

 

Now listen again to Amy Goodheart, interviewed by Ronald Duster, while you check the transcription of her interview below.

INTERVIEWER:

Amy Goodheart is fascinated by villains. Her interest has taken her to a cold dark cellar full of some of the most horrible faces in history. She has been to the London Dungeon. Tell us what you found there, Amy.

AMY GOODHEART:

Well, the Dungeon is an exhibition of British medieval history, but actually it concentrates on torture, punishment, disease and death.

INTERVIEWER:

So you saw some pretty major villains there?

AMY GOODHEART:

Not specific villains, no, but people who were punished for crimes, whether they were real or imaginary, people who were tortured because they didn't believe in the right things. So in lots of ways it's not the villains who are there but the victims.

INTERVIEWER:

Could you describe some of the punishments these victims suffered then?

AMY GOODHEART:

Well, for instance, in those days, if they wanted you to confess to some crime, and you wouldn't, well, they would pile a lot of heavy stones on top of you until you died. So in that case we'd say the villain was the man who was trying to get you to confess, but not the person who was actually suffering the torture. I mean, they could do all sorts of terrible things to you, even though you probably weren't guilty at all. And in the London Dungeon you feel as if you're actually watching those terrible things happening.

INTERVIEWER:

How long has it been going?

AMY GOODHEART:

Since 1974.

INTERVIEWER:

And who came up with the idea for such a place?

AMY GOODHEART:

Well, it was first thought of by a nice lady who was a London housewife. She had three children, and her name was Annabel Geddes. And she started it because she'd taken her children to the Tower of London, and there were all sorts of notices and descriptions of bloody deeds, but there was no blood at all, and the children were very disappointed. And she thought that, you know, perhaps something actually showing the blood did have a place and would have a certain appeal. So she started this.

INTERVIEWER:

How did she go about it?

AMY GOODHEART:

It was difficult at first because she had no experience; she'd never been in any kind of business at all. Er, so she went and talked to a few of her friends, and her bank. And then she was introduced to a few film set designers: and so it built up gradually.

INTERVIEWER:

How popular is the museum? How many people visit it every year?

AMY GOODHEART:

Over four hundred thousand.

INTERVIEWER:

And why do you think people want to see something like that?

AMY GOODHEART:

It's difficult to say, but everybody is sort of fascinated by things that frighten them. And I, I think that because everything that's shown happened a long time ago, people can go and look at it, and when they get to the end, they can shrug their shoulders and say, 'But isn't it good that we don't treat anybody like that any more?' I don't know why children are so fascinated, but an awful lot of children go there, and you'd think they would be frightened, but they actually love it.

INTERVIEWER:

Now it's in, I think, quite an old part of the city really. Erm, are there any real life ghosts there at all?

AMY GOODHEART:

I'm not absolutely sure, and quite honestly I'm not brave enough to stay there at night to find out !!

 

The London Dungeon

 

ACTIVITY 67: After listening to the interview, choose the best alternatives from the menus to complete this summary of what is said during the interview. Then check the answers.

The exhibits in the London Dungeon concentrate on torture,

punishment, disease and  . The Dungeon

shows, for example, criminals being tortured with heavy 

. But these people were actually not villains

but  .

You did not have to be    of a crime to suffer  .

The London Dungeon was started in    by a London 

. She had the idea after she had taken her children to the Tower of

London. The children were disappointed in the Tower because they could not see

any    there.

Now the London Dungeon is visited by more than    people every

year. All these people must enjoy being  .

Oh, God !! Si visito ese museo me tienen que hospitalizar luego !!
En la página siguiente Mr. Grammar explicará una nueva gramática: MAKING DEDUCTIONS ...

 

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