Curso First Certificate Exam

LOS CURSOS DE INGLES GRATIS PREFERIDOS POR LOS HISPANOHABLANTES

 

LECCION 34 - PAGINA 1   índice del curso   página siguiente

Money, money

 

Questions

 

 

 

 

ASKING WITH POLITENESS

Look at these two questions. Which of them seems more polite?

a.

'What does that mean, being a football trainee?'

b.

'Could you tell us what that means, being a football trainee?'

The second question seems more polite because of the structure used: indirect question.

One of the many ways of signalling politeness in British English is to use indirect rather than direct questions: these have the effect of making the sentence longer and less direct, both of which are usually interpreted as a sign of politeness.

PITCH IN BRITISH ENGLISH

Pitch is the property of sound that changes with variation in the frequency of vibration, that is, how the level of your speech is set.

Now, pay close attention to the following basic points about the implication of pitch in British English:

USE OF THIS VOICE:

 

IMPLIES THESE ATTITUDES:

middle range

neutral / normal

low range

rude / bored / aggressive

high range

polite / uncertain

Note that some nationalities will need to pay more attention to this phonological feature than others, especially if the normal range usually used in the mother tongue is the low range.

AUDIO EXAMPLES

And now let us check the following ten examples. Just click on the speakers and listen carefully. After listening to each audio file, repeat it aloud trying to imitate the intonation:

1.

ACQUAINTANCE TO ACQUAINTANCE

What does that mean, being a football trainee?

 

2.

REPORTER TO STRANGER TO APPEAR POLITE

Could you tell us what that means, being a football trainee?

 

3.

JOB APPLICANT TO INTERVIEWER

Could you tell me what the salary is?

 

4.

FRIEND TO FRIEND

What's the salary?

 

5.

PARENT OR TEACHER TO CHILD

Shut the door.

 

6.

COLLEAGUE TO COLLEAGUE

Could you please shut the door?

 

7.

CLASSMATE TO CLASSMATE

Can you repeat that?

 

8.

STUDENT TO TEACHER

Do you think you could possibly repeat that, please?

 

9.

FRIEND TO FRIEND

Do you know where the lifts are?

 

10.

STRANGER TO STRANGER

Do you know where the lifts are?

FINAL ADVICE

For teaching purposes only, we think these two basic rules simplify complex linguistic and social behaviour:

RULE 1. When p2ople want to show politeness in spoken British English they tend to use a higher pitch and longer sentences. This is particularly true when talking to strangers or superiors.

RULE 2. When speaking to people they know well or strangers they want to seem friendly towards, they tend to use shorter sentences and a lower pitch.

In the exercise below you can practise this grammar.

 

MY USEFUL LINKS / MIS ENLACES UTILES

 

Questions

 

ACTIVITY 237: Mr. Grammar mentions above some general rules about asking politely in English. Summarize this general rule by choosing the appropriate alternatives from the menus. Then check the answers.

When asking questions or making requests politely (e.g. when speaking to    or superiors), English speakers tend to use longer sentences (e.g. indirect questions) and to    the pitch of their voice.

When speaking to people they know well or to strangers they want to seem    with, they don't use such    sentences and they don't raise their pitch so much.

 

Tanto las explicaciones de Mr. Grammar como la colección de enlaces que nos ofrece Mr. Help son de suma utilidad !!! 
En la página siguiente retomarás la práctica del ODD ONE OUT ...

 

LECCION 34 - PAGINA 1   índice del curso   página siguiente