FCE Grammar Revision

LOS CURSOS DE INGLES GRATIS PREFERIDOS POR LOS HISPANOHABLANTES

 

DISEÑADO EN

60

LECCIONES

REGÍSTRATE AQUÍ PARA PARTICIPAR DE ESTE FLAMANTE CURSO ESTRELLA

 

Countable & Uncountable Nouns

 

The meaning of highlighted words is explained at the end of the passage.

Countable Nouns

  • Countable nouns are easy to recognize and express things you can count. For example: "chair". You can count chairs. You can have one, two, three or more chairs at home. Here are some more countable nouns: dog, cat, animal, man, person, bottle, box, litre, coin, note, dollar, cup, plate, fork, table, chair, suitcase.

  • Countable nouns can be singular or plural: My cat is playing; My cats are hungry.

  • You can use the indefinite article A/AN with countable nouns: A cat is an animal.

  • When a countable noun is singular, you must use a word like A/THE/MY/THIS with it: I want an orange. (not I want orange); Where is my bottle? (not Where is bottle?).

  • When a countable noun is plural, you can use it alone: I like oranges; Bottles can break.

  • You can use SOME and ANY with countable nouns: I've got some dollars; Have you got any pens?

  • You can use A FEW and MANY with countable nouns: I've got a few dollars; I haven't got many pens.

TIP

"People" is countable. "People" is the plural of "person". You can count people. i.e. There is one person here. There are three people here.  

 
 

Uncountable Nouns

  • Uncountable nouns are substances, concepts, etc. that you cannot divide into separate elements. You cannot "count" them. For example, you cannot count "milk". You can count "bottles of milk" or "litres of milk", but YOU CANNOT COUNT "milk" itself. Here are some more uncountable nouns: music, art, love, happiness, advice, information, news, furniture, luggage, sugar, butter, water, electricity, gas, power, money (YOU CANNOT SAY: one money, two moneys, BUT you can say: ONE dollar note, TWO dollar notes).

  • You usually consider uncountable nouns as singular. In that case, you must use a SINGULAR VERB. For example: This news is very important; Your luggage looks heavy.

  • You do not usually use the indefinite article A/AN with uncountable nouns. You CANNOT SAY "an information" or "a music". But you can say a "something" of: a piece of news, a bottle of water, a grain of rice, a can of Coke, etc.

  • You can use SOME and ANY with uncountable nouns: I've got some money; I need some water; Have you got any rice?

  • You can use A LITTLE and MUCH with uncountable nouns: I've got a little money; I haven't got much rice.

TIP

Drinks (coffee, water, juices, etc.) are usually uncountable. But if you are thinking of a cup/glass, we can also say: Two teas and one coffee, please.

 

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

Sometimes, the same noun can be countable and uncountable, often with a change of meaning.  

COUNTABLE

NOUNS

UNCOUNTABLE

There are two hairs in my coffee!  

hair

I don't have much hair.  

There are two lights in our bedroom.  

light

Close the curtain. There's too much light!  

Shhhhh! I thought I heard a noise.  

noise

I can't work when there is too much noise.  

Have you got a newspaper to read?  

paper

I want to draw. Have you got some paper?  

Our house has seven rooms.  

room

Is there room for me to sit here?  

We had a great time at the party.  

time

Have you got time for a coffee?  

La Traviata is one of Verdi's works.  

work

I have no money. I need work!

 

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