Conversaciones en un Autobús

LOS CURSOS DE INGLES GRATIS PREFERIDOS POR LOS HISPANOHABLANTES

Bus Driver and Rebel

 STEP 3

Listening and Checking with transcription

In this last step, listen to the conversation again while you read the transcription. Finally, read the glossary information and notes at the bottom. This step also means good practice for your reading comprehension skills.

An enigmatic character - an annoying rebel -  goes onboard. He not only behaves like a strange person, but he also refuses to pay his fare. Let's listen to their conversation...

Click on PLAY

DRIVER

Sir...

REBEL

What?

DRIVER

You haven't paid your fare.

REBEL

No.

DRIVER

You have to pay when you enter.

REBEL

What?

DRIVER

You can pay now... Are you going to pay your fare or not?

REBEL

No.

DRIVER

What do you mean, "No"? Everyone pays a fare, mister. That's the law. What do you mean you don't want to pay, huh? The law is you pay. So you pay. Now, just drop your money in the box like everyone else, OK?

REBEL

No.

DRIVER

Look, mister, I'm tired of kooks. Either you pay by the next stop or you get off the bus there. You understand?

REBEL

I won't pay and I won't get off. What's it to you?

DRIVER

Look, you're causing a lot of trouble.

REBEL

Am I bothering you? Am I disturbing you?

DRIVER

Mister, I don't care if you're quiet as a mouse and sweet as Santa Claus. The money goes in the box.

REBEL

No.

DRIVER

Then you get off. Did you hear? Off.

 

GLOSSARY & NOTES

a rebel: Someone who exhibits great independence in thought and action and is usually disobedient to or defiant of law.

behaves = conducts himself in a certain manner.

refuses = does not want to do; shows unwillingness towards

fare: The sum of money charged for riding in public transportation.

mister: Used alone (not followed by a man's name) as here, ranges (according to the tone of voice) from a rather neutral form of address to one expressing a bit of disrespect or annoyance. It is, in any case, less respectful than the more formal sir.

kook: An odd, eccentrict, disliked person.

You understand? = Do you understand? In informal speech, the first word of a yes/no question is frequently omitted.

What's it to you?: An impolite rejoinder meaning Why do you care? or Why do you think it's your business?

Source: English Teaching Forum - Authors: Kathleen Seley & Lewis Barnett

 

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