CAE :: Lesson 26

LOS CURSOS DE INGLES GRATIS PREFERIDOS POR LOS HISPANOHABLANTES

 

LECCION 26 - PAGINA 1   índice del curso   página siguiente

Use of English

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1.

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2.

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3.

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5.

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6.

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7.

Lee aquí si no ves las consolas de audio o no escuchas el sonido.

8.

Solicita aquí tu examen final sólo cuando hayas...

a.

... completado las 40 lecciones y el test parcial que componen este curso.

b.

... alcanzado los 90 días como estudiante registrado.

 

Pronouns

 

 

 

Now lets us revise all about pronouns...

GENERIC PRONOUNS

We often use you to mean people in general.

1.

You can learn a language faster if you go to live in a country where it is spoken.

We can also use one + 3rd person singular of the verb to mean people in general. One is more formal than you and is rarely used in spoken English.

2.

One should never criticize without being sure of the facts.

We can also be used to make a general statement which includes the reader or listener.

3.

When we talk about an accent, we must not confuse this with pronunciation.

In informal English, we also often use they to talk about other people in general, or people in authority, e.g. They always say... (they = people in general). They should make it compulsory... (they = the government).

4.

They always say that it's never too late to learn a new language.

5.

They should make it compulsory for people to learn two foreign languages at school.

We often use they, them, and their to refer to one person who may be male or female, instead or using he or she, his or her, etc.

6.

If someone goes to live in a foreign country, they will have to get used to a different way of life.

7.

Could the person who left their bag in the library please come and see me?

REFLEXIVE AND RECIPROCAL PRONOUNS

We often use reflexive pronouns when the subject and object of a verb are the same person. We don't usually use reflexive pronouns with wash, shave, feel, relax, concentrate NOT  relax yourself .

1.

You need to look after yourself with that cold.

2.

He's very egocentric. He always talks about himself.

We also use reflexive pronouns after most prepositions when the complement is the same as the subject. After prepositions of place, we use object pronouns, not reflexive pronouns, e.g. She put the bag next to her on the seat NOT  next to herself .

3.

I managed to complete the crossword! I was really pleased with myself.

We can also use reflexive pronouns to emphasize the subject, e.g. We decorated the house ourselves (= we did it, not professional decorators).

4.

We decorated the house ourselves.

5.

I'm not going to do it for you. Do it yourself!

By + reflexive pronoun = alone, on your own.

6.

I don't feel very comfortable going to the cinema by myself.

We use each other or one another for reciprocal actions.
Example: A does the action to B and B does the action to A.
And now compare these two examples:
They bought themselves some new shoes.
(= A bought some for A, and B bought some for B).
They bought each other some new shoes.
(= A bought some for B and B bought some for A).

7.

My ex-husband and I don't talk to each other any more.

8.

My mother and sister don't understand one another at all.

IT AND THERE

We use it + be to talk about time, temperature, and distance.

1.

It's five miles to London  /  It's 10 o'clock

We also use it + be as a 'preparatory' subject before adjectives. It was great to hear from you is more natural than To hear from you was great.

2.

It was great to hear that you and Martina are getting married!

3.

It used to be difficult to buy fresh pasta in the UK, but now you can get it everywhere.

We use there + be + noun to say if people and things are present or exist (or not). You cannot use It... here. NOT  It used to be a shop in that street .

4.

There's a big crowd of people in the town centre.

5.

There used to be a shop in that street, but there isn't one any more.

6.

There are three meetings this week.

On the next page you will be able to practise this grammar.

 
 

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