Curso Avanzado de Inglés de Negocios

LOS CURSOS DE INGLES GRATIS PREFERIDOS POR LOS HISPANOHABLANTES

 

LECCION 2 - PAGINA 2   índice del curso   página anterior   página siguiente

 

STEP 3

Listening and Checking with Transcription

In this third step, listen to the conversation again while you read the transcription. Finally, read the glossary information, phrasal verbs (highlighted in yellow) and notes at the bottom. This step also means good practice for your reading comprehension skills. To get information in Spanish, just place the arrow of your mouse on any highlighted word without clicking.

Appointing the New Advertising Manager

 

Click on PLAY to listen to the conversation

(In John Martin’s office)

JOHN

OK, Sally. I'm ready to see the applicants for the new job. Let's have the first one in. Who is it?

SALLY

It's a Mr. Windsmore.

JOHN

Ask him to come in, will you?

SALLY

Mr. Windsmore.

JOHN

Ah, how do you do, Mr. Windsmore.

WINDSMORE

How do you do.

JOHN

Do sit down.

WINDSMORE

Thank you.

JOHN

Now, let me explain the job. We plan to increase our advertising quite considerably. At the present moment a firm of advertising agents handles our account, but we haven't been too pleased with results lately and we may give our account to another agency.

WINDSMORE

What would my work entail?

JOHN

You'd be responsible to me for all advertising and to Mr. Grant for public relations. You would brief the agency, whoever it is, on the kind of advertising campaign we want. You would also be responsible for getting our leaflets, brochures and catalogues designed.

WINDSMORE

I presume you advertise in the national Press as well as the trade Press?

JOHN

Yes, we do.

WINDSMORE

Have you thought about advertising on television?

JOHN

We don't think it's a suitable medium for us. And it's much too expensive.

WINDSMORE

I can just imagine a scene with a typist sitting on an old‑fashioned typing chair, her back aching, exhausted... then we show her in one of your chairs, her back properly supported, feeling full of energy, typing twice as quickly...

JOHN

Before you get carried away with your little scene, Mr. Windsmore, I regret to have to tell you again that we are not planning to go into television.

WINDSMORE

That's a shame! I've been doing a lot of television work lately and it interests me enormously.

JOHN

Then I really don't think that this is quite the right job for you here, Mr. Windsmore...

(He leaves) 

JOHN

Sally, who's next?

SALLY

There are two more. The rest are coming tomorrow. Er... one is a woman.

JOHN

What! Really? There weren't any women applicants.

SALLY

Yes. It's J. P. Harvey. The “J” is for Joanna.

JOHN

Miss or Mrs.?

SALLY

Miss.

JOHN

Where's her letter of application? I can't find it. Has she had any experience? I wonder why I picked her out for an interview.

SALLY

Here's her letter.

JOHN

Thanks. Yes, she signs the letter J. P. Harvey. Hmm, let's see. Did I make a mistake? I can't think a woman would be likely to have the right qualifications...

SALLY

Why not, Mr. Martin? The letter says that she's been an account executive for a year...

JOHN

Oh, yes. Well, well! What's she like, Sally?

SALLY

I'll show her in, Mr. Martin, and then you can decide.

(The interview has started) 

JOHN

How did you begin in advertising, Miss Harvey?

JOANNA

I joined a training scheme run by the Palmer & Vincent Agency and stayed with them for a year.

JOHN

That was before you moved to your present agency?

JOANNA

That's right. And I've worked with them for the past three years. Last year I became an account executive.

JOHN

What exactly is your work at the moment?

JOANNA

Well, I handle quite a number of accounts. I plan the advertising campaign, co‑ordinate the work of the visualiser, the copywriter, artists and typographers. I discuss the layout with the clients, check proofs and, sometimes, have to do the work of the specialists when there's a crisis, as there usually is.

JOHN

You seem to have had the right kind of experience. I think you'd do the work well, but ... well, all the executives are men and... er...

JOANNA

And I always thought industry was so go-head and modern!!

JOHN

I don't mind telling you you're quite high on my list, but...

JOANNA

But you'd prefer a man?

JOHN

No. I was going to say... If only I can convince our Managing Director. I'll do my best.

(Later) 

PETER

I don't believe it, John! You mean the old man's really appointed the girl? Fantastic! How did you manage to persuade him?

JOHN

I didn't, Peter. She persuaded him herself. He saw the two best candidates, and the girl got the job. Splendid! I can't wait to meet her. I say, this firm is looking up!!

 

 

GLOSSARY & NOTES

 

to come in

To enter (ingresar, entrar).

account group

A team of experts in an advertising agency who work together to create and advertising campaign for the account, which here means the client (asesores de cuentas publicitarias).

to entail

To involve, to imply (implicar, involucrar, comprender).

leaflet

A single sheet of paper, or a few sheets loosely bound together, usually advertising something or giving information. Less elaborate than a brochure (folleto pequeño de 2 o 3 caras).

brochure

More elaborate than a leaflet. A printed booklet giving information on the company and its products (folleto encuadernado).

to get carried away with

To be transported mentally or emotionally by (dejarse llevar por las fantasías o por las proyecciones personales).

to pick out

To choose, to select (elegir, seleccionar, escoger).

account executive

An executive is a person in a senior position. An account executive is an advertising term; it means a person in an advertising agency who looks after the affairs of one particular firm or client (called an account) (ejecutivo de cuentas publicitarias).

to show in

To ask to go in (hacer pasar).

to run

To administrate, to direct, to control (controlar, dirigir, administrar).

visualiser

Someone whose job it is to invent or visualise an idea for a good advertisement (mentor publicitario, generador de ideas).

typographer

As applied to advertising, it means a person who chooses the fonts or type to make the printing in an advertisement look attractive (tipógrafo).

layout

As used here it means the arrangement of material in an advertisement, ie. where the photograph, or drawing, is put in relation to the words (distribución, planificación).

go-ahead

Ready to embark on bold new ventures (emprendedoras).

quite high on my list

One of the first on my candidates list (una de las primeras en mi lista de candidatos).

to look up

To improve in prosperity (ir cada día mejor).

 

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