Curso Avanzado de Inglés de Negocios

LOS CURSOS DE INGLES GRATIS PREFERIDOS POR LOS HISPANOHABLANTES

 

LECCION 4 - PAGINA 2   índice del curso   página anterior   página siguiente

 

STEP 3

Listening and Checking with Transcription

In this third step, listen to the conversation again while you read the transcription. Finally, read the glossary information, phrasal verbs (highlighted in yellow) and notes at the bottom. This step also means good practice for your reading comprehension skills. To get information in Spanish, just place the arrow of your mouse on any highlighted word without clicking.

An Accident in the Factory

Click on PLAY to listen to the conversation

(In John Martin's office) 

PETER

Hello, John! A lot of work going on here, I see.

JOHN

Yes, we're up to our eyes. We've had a record sales week.

PETER

Splendid. (telephone rings).

JOHN

Hello? John Martin here. Yes, Mr. Wiles is here, Ted. What! Oh, no. How frightful! Is the man all right? Yes, come on up... That was Ted Fielding. He's been phoning for you all over the building. There's been an accident in the fitters' shop.

PETER

Oh Lord! Why didn't he go straight to the Personnel Manager? That's his business.

JOHN

Ian Hampden's away.

PETER

Oh, I'd forgotten he was going away this week. Then I suppose it is my responsibility. Is it serious?

JOHN

Ted didn't say. He seemed anxious to come up and see you right away. Ah, here he is...   come in, Ted.

PETER

Good Heavens, man, you look awful. It's not a fatal accident, is it?

TED

No, but it's very nasty.

JOHN

Sit down, Ted. What happened?

TED

It's Reg Arnold in the fitters' shop. He didn't put on goggles when he was using the grinding‑machine and a lot of steel filings flew up. Oh, he looks terrible; one eye's very bad. The foreman called me, and I sent for Robinson, who's trained in first aid. I called you as soon as I could.

PETER

Where is Reg now?

TED

They've taken him to the first‑aid room, until the ambulance arrives. (ambulance coming in) Ah, there's the ambulance now.

JOHN

Let's go down.

PETER

Not so fast, John.

JOHN

What do you mean?

PETER

Don't rush things.

JOHN

For goodness sake!! Surely we can see the poor chap into the ambulance.

PETER

I think we'll all stay here. An industrial accident can be a tricky affair. It's best to keep out of the way.

JOHN

Surely not. It was the man's own fault by the sound of it.

PETER

My experience is that when there's an accident it's never the man's fault; anyway, in the opinion of our own particular shop steward. You'll see, Jack Green will make the most of this. He'll suggest that the supervisor should have noticed that he wasn't wearing goggles and insisted that he put them on. It could cost the firm a lot of money.

(An hour later, in Peter Wiles's office) 

JANE

Oh, Mr. Wiles, Jack Green, the shop steward, is waiting to see you.

PETER

Ah, the inevitable! All right. Ask him to come in.

JANE

Yes.

PETER

Ah, Jack, I've been expecting you.

(Later that day, John comes into Peter's office) 

JOHN

Hello, Peter! You've had a visit from Green, I gather.

PETER

Yes. He says the safety precautions are inadequate.

JOHN

Surely they can't be. After all, there's a notice hanging over every machine warning the men to wear goggles.

PETER

Yes, but Green wants a full-time safety manager. I wonder what H.G. will say to that!!

JOHN

Well, you haven't got to worry about Reg Arnold sueing the company. H.G. asked me to go down to the hospital to see him. I did, and he admitted it was entirely his fault.

PETER

What did he say?

JOHN

He was almost apologetic. As if we were the ones who were suffering! He said he was sorry he'd caused so much trouble.

PETER

Hmm... Did anyone else hear him say that, apart from you?

JOHN

Yes. Ted Fielding, who came with me, and two nurses.

PETER

Good. Arnold won't be able to make out a case of negligence against us, when Green gets hold of him.

JOHN

I never realised how tough you could be. You haven't given a thought to the poor unfortunate man. All you care about is the politics of the affair. You're as bad as Jack Green.

PETER

Well, someone's got to be tough if you want to stay in business.

JOHN

I couldn't disagree with you more. Where are you going? Golf, I suppose.

PETER

Not a bad idea on a lovely afternoon like this. No, as a matter of fact I thought I'd call at the hospital on my way home to see Reg Arnold. But I'll get the Personnel Department to check up first how many weeks at full pay he's entitled to under the company sick‑pay scheme. You know, it makes up the difference between National Insurance payments and his normal basic rate. That should cheer him up!!

 

 

GLOSSARY & NOTES

record sales week

This means that more goods were sold in this week than ever before. To break this record the sales will have to be even higher in the future (semana de ventas que supera el record).

to go away

To leave (irse de viaje).

very nasty

Awful, terrible (espantoso, horrible).

to put on

To dress oneself in or to put accesories on (vestirse, ponerse, colocarse algo encima).

steel filings

Small particles of steel (partículas de acero).

foreman

The employee responsible for the work of the men under him, the efficiency of the department and the quality and quantity of the work produced. Also, man in charge of a department or group of departments (capataz).

first aid

Emergency care given before regular medical aid can be obtained (primeros auxilios).

don't rush things

Don't hurry up (No apures las cosas).

to keep out

To stay outside (no entrometerse, conservar la distancia).

supervisor

In a large department there may be several foremen under a supervisor, each with a special responsibility (supervisor).

safety precautions  

A precaution is something you take to prevent a potentially dangerous situation from causing an accident. The regulation which made it obligatory to wear goggles when using certain machines was a safety precaution (medidas de seguridad).

full-time

One who works permanently at this job only (jornada completa). You can either work full-time, that is, full working day, or part-time, part of the day only (jornada incompleta).

to be apologetic

To offer or express apologies (pedir disculpas).

to call at

To stop for a short visit (hacer una corta visita).

to check up

To verify (comprobar, verificar).

to be entitled to

To be qualified for by right according to law (tener derecho a, estar autorizado a).

to make out

To pretend (simular, fingir).

sick-pay

Wages paid to an employee who is on sick leave (licencia por enfermedad).

to make up

To compensate (complementar, compensar).

to cheer up

To help someone feel less worried (alegrar).

 

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