Curso Avanzado de Inglés de Negocios

LOS CURSOS DE INGLES GRATIS PREFERIDOS POR LOS HISPANOHABLANTES

 

LECCION 12 - PAGINA 2   índice del curso   página anterior   página siguiente

 

STEP 3

Listening and Checking with Transcription
 

In this third step, listen to the conversation again while you read the transcription. Finally, read the glossary information, phrasal verbs (highlighted in yellow) and notes at the bottom. This step also means good practice for your reading comprehension skills. To get information in Spanish, just place the arrow of your mouse on any highlighted word without clicking.

The Pension Fund Meeting

Click on PLAY to listen to the conversation

(In Peter Wiles's office) 

PETER

Ian, what's this about Bob Hardiman being sacked? He's been with the firm since it started, and he's the only real craftsman we've got.

IAN

Yes, but H.G. rightly points out that there's no call for elaborate hand‑carving on desks nowadays; we don't need desks like this one you've got here, for example. He says Hardiman is now redundant.

PETER

Ah, it'll break the old boy's heart. Wait. I've got an idea.

IAN

What?

PETER

The Pension Fund Trustees' Meeting. It's this Thursday. His name's bound to come up if he's being dismissed; his pension'll have to be approved.

IAN

How will that help him? It won't save him from redundancy.

PETER

No, but that's when we can speak up. There's you and me on one side and H.G. and our dear company secretary on the other. Oh Lord!! We've got to think of something... Look, I've got another idea. Hardiman left the firm for a while, didn't he?

IAN

Hmm. Yes, about five years ago. He came back to us two years ago.

PETER

Why did he leave?

IAN

He went to live in Scotland to look after his father. When his father died, he came back to us.

PETER

I see. And what happened to all the contributions he'd paid into the Pension Fund before he went to Scotland?

IAN

He left them in the fund.

PETER

So he still qualifies for a pension?

IAN

Yes. H.G. will say he'll get his pension, so what is there to worry about?

PETER

But the thing is, Ian, is Hardiman entitled to the full pension if he broke his employment with us? Let's look up the articles of the Pension Fund. Have you got a copy?

IAN

Ah, I'll have a look.

(Thursday: the Pension Fund Meeting is in progress)

GRANT

Well, gentlemen, this isn't going to take us very long. You've seen Mr. Buckhurst's pension fund accounts. They're impeccable, as usual. So it's only a question of approving them for the sake of the record. Right. Do you all agree the accounts? (Murmurs of assent) Good. Well, that's all. I presume there's no other business?

IAN

Well, there is one thing more, H.G. The question of redundancy, the case of Bob Hardiman...

GRANT

That's a straightforward case. He gets his pension, less three years, or whatever it is. You'll see to that, won't you?

IAN

I don't think it's quite as simple as that.

GRANT

Why on earth not?

IAN

Peter will explain.

PETER

There seems to be some slight difficulty, H.G. You see, Hardiman left us for three years, as you know.

GRANT

I know very well he did. I've just said so.

PETER

Quite so. But I felt I should look up the articles of the fund. Ian, of course, is already aware of this. It seems that if a period of employment is interrupted for more than six months, a further period of five years has to be worked before the employee is entitled to a full pension. If Hardiman continues with us until he's due to retire, that is, in three years' time, there is, of course, no problem. He will be fully entitled. But as things stand at present he would get, at a rough guess, only about three‑quarters of his pension. And we could hardly allow that situation with such an old employee. It would do the company no good at all. He will, naturally, have to be compensated out of the company's funds to make his pension up to the proper amount.

GRANT

But that's preposterous!!

PETER

But it does seem to be the only thing to do.

GRANT

We'll just have to alter the articles. Oh dear!!

PETER

You don't think we could pay the remaining pension out of the company's profits?

GRANT

No. That would be a very dangerous precedent. No, no, I won't consider that. Ian, this is your scheme, I'm sure.

IAN

Mine, H.G.?

GRANT

Well, you win. We keep Hardiman on for three more years. But, Peter, I shall expect you to use your undoubted ingenuity in making full use of him.

PETER

Of course, sir.

 

 

GLOSSARY & NOTES

 

to point out

To remark, to make a comment on (señalar, resaltar).

there's no call

There is not any demand; nobody is interested in buying (no hay pedidos o demanda).

bound

With obligation (obligatoriamente).

to come up

To be mentioned (surgir, mencionar).

redundancy

When an employee's job becomes unnecessary to a company he becomes redundant. Redundancy, therefore, leads to dismissal, premature retirement or transfer to another department (despido por cierre de empresa o reducción de personal).

to speak up

To speak one's opinion without fear or hesitation (dar sin vueltas nuestra opinión).

to come back

To return to a previous activity (volver o regresar a un puesto de trabajo).

to look after

Take care of, to watch over (cuidar, hacerse cargo de).

contributions

The weekly or monthly payments into the Trust Fund by employer and employee (aportes previsionales).

to be entitled to

To have the right to (tener derecho a).

to look up

To seek information from (consultar, buscar información de).

in progress

Being carried on; going on at the moment (en marcha).

to see to it

To be careful or certain to do something (hacer algo al respecto).

preposterous

Absurd, ridiculous (absurdo, ridículo, sin sentido).

to pay out (of)

To pay money from a particular source (utilizar el dinero para pagar de).

precedent

An example used to justify similar occurrences at a later time (precedente, antecedente).

 

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